Noah _Bud_ Ogle Cabin, Roaring Fork Nature Trail, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee

The Noah “Bud” Ogle Place was a homestead located in the Great Smoky Mountains of Sevier County, in the U.S. state of Tennessee. The homestead presently consists of a cabin, barn, and tub mill built by mountain farmer Noah “Bud” Ogle (1863–1913) in the late 19th-century. In 1977, the homestead was added to the National Register of Historic Places and is currently maintained by the Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

The surviving structures at the Noah Ogle Place are characteristic of a typical 19th-century Southern Appalachian mountain farm. Ogle’s cabin is a type known as a “saddlebag” cabin (two single-pen cabins joined by a common chimney), which was a relatively rare design in the region. Ogle’s barn is an excellent example of a four-pen barn, a design once common in the area, although this barn is the last remaining four-pen barn in the park. Ogle’s tub mill is the park’s last surviving operational tub mill and one of the few operational tub mills in the region. A later owner of the Ogle farm renamed the farm “Junglebrook,” and the farm is thus sometimes referred to as the “Junglebrook Historic District.”

Roaring Fork is a stream in the Great Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, located in the Southeastern United States. Once the site of a small Appalachian community, today the stream’s area is home to the Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail and the Roaring Fork Historic District.

Like many mountain streams, Roaring Fork is volatile. While the stream presents as a peaceful trickle on any given day, it quickly becomes a raging whitewater rapid after a mild rain shower. The “roar” of the water is amplified by its echo on surrounding mountain ridges.

Great Smoky Mountains National Park is a United States National Park and UNESCO World Heritage Site that straddles the ridgeline of the Great Smoky Mountains, part of the Blue Ridge Mountains, which are a division of the larger Appalachian Mountain chain. The border between Tennessee and North Carolina runs northeast to southwest through the centerline of the park. It is the most visited national park in the United States.On its route from Maine to Georgia, the Appalachian Trail also passes through the center of the park. The park was chartered by the United States Congress in 1934 and officially dedicated by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1940. It encompasses 522,419 acres (816.28 sq mi; 2,114.15 km2),[1] making it one of the largest protected areas in the eastern United States. The main park entrances are located along U.S. Highway 441 (Newfound Gap Road) at the towns of Gatlinburg, Tennessee, and Cherokee, North Carolina. It was the first national park whose land and other costs were paid for in part with federal funds; previous parks were funded wholly with state money or private funds.

Noah _Bud_ Ogle Cabin, Roaring Fork Nature Trail, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Tennessee

Paul Moore is a man who lives and works comfortably amongst two passions: nature and photography. Though he is content working in either arena, it is when these two are combined that his true talent shines. A short walk along a simple garden path becomes a lesson in the Latin names of even the tiniest plant and every angle is framed for you as he draws your eye to a shot you couldn’t have otherwise imagined. You can often find him leading tours of this kind through his expansive Native Plant Garden in Nashville, TN—a masterpiece he has been working on for nearly 30 years. As the result of a constant love of learning, Paul’s photography has evolved to include more architectural subjects. “The perfect niche has been finding plants with inspired architecture” he says. His enthusiasm is infectious and his knowledge is palpable, he is man of exceeding talent and a slew of great dad-jokes. He currently resides in Nashville, TN with his wife and hoard of cats among his native plant garden and camera gear.

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