Rainbow Over Seastacks, Bandon, Oregon

A stack or seastack is a geological landform consisting of a steep and often vertical column or columns of rock in the sea near a coast, formed by erosion.Stacks are formed over time by wind and water, processes of coastal geomorphology.They are formed when part of a headland is eroded by hydraulic action, which is the force of the sea or water crashing against the rock. The force of the water weakens cracks in the headland, causing them to later collapse, forming free-standing stacks and even a small island. Without the constant presence of water, stacks also form when a natural arch collapses under gravity, due to sub-aerial processes like wind erosion. Stacks can provide important nesting locations for seabirds, and many are popular for rock climbing.
Stacks at the island of Fårö, southern Sweden

Isolated steep-sided, rocky oceanic islets, typically of volcanic origin, are also loosely called “stacks” or “volcanic stacks”.

Bandon is a city in Coos County, Oregon, United States, on the south side of the mouth of the Coquille River. It was named by George Bennet, an Irish peer, who settled nearby in 1873 and named the town after Bandon in Ireland, his hometown. The population was 3,066 at the 2010 census.In 2010, Bandon was named one of the “Coolest Small Towns in America” by BudgetTravel

Rainbow Over Seastacks, Bandon, Oregon

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