Woodland in Mist, Vosges, France

Mist is a phenomenon caused by small droplets of water suspended in air. Physically it is one instance of a dispersion. It is most commonly seen where warm, moist air meets sudden cooling, such as in exhaled air in the winter, or when throwing water onto the hot stove of a sauna. It is often created artificially with aerosol canisters if the humidity and temperature conditions are right. It can also occur as part of natural weather, when humid air cools rapidly, for example when the air comes into contact with surfaces that are much cooler than the air.

The formation of mist, as of other suspensions, is greatly aided by the presence of nucleation sites on which the suspended water phase can congeal. Thus even such unusual sources as small particulates from volcanic eruptions, releases of strongly polar gases, and even the ions released by the polar lights can in right conditions trigger the formation of mist.

The Vosges also called the Vosges Mountains, are a range of low mountains in eastern France, near its border with Germany. Together with the Palatine Forest to the north on the German side of the border, they form a single geomorphological unit and low mountain range of around 8,000 square kilometres (3,100 sq mi) in area, which runs in a north-northeast direction from the Burgundian Gate (the Belfort–Ronchamp–Lure line) to the Börrstadt Basin (the Winnweiler–Börrstadt–Göllheim line) and which forms the western boundary of the Upper Rhine Plain. The Grand Ballon is their highest peak at 1424 m, followed by the Storkenkopf (1366 m) and the Hohneck (1364 m).

Woodland in Mist, Vosges, France

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